May
03

The Full Circle

Filed Under (Food & Agriculture) by elizabeth on 03-05-2013

Over the course of my blogging experience, I have covered various aspects of sustainable agriculture, and they all point to one thing: the need for action.

Our actions must start small, but must also be numerous in order to make change. Some may see sustainable agriculture as a fight against large agricultural corporations, like Monsanto. True, these companies have supplanted natural farming for technology–pesticides, genetically modified seeds, etc.–but this movement does not have to be a battle. Instead, the wider population needs to be educated on sustainable farming practices and more people must engage in agriculture, whether it is a small vegetable garden on the roof of a high rise building or a larger operation providing fresh food to the local area.

Google fair use

Google fair use

In the end, more education can change everything. The U.S. Farm Bill comes up for renewal every five or so years and can be changed according to the times. The more people involved in sustainable agriculture, the more activists who can make their voices be heard by the government. According to one fellow blogger, the 1996 and 2008 farm bills were successes due to lobbyists’ efforts (Field et al. 2013). Grants were given to important food projects and small family farms were granted more protection. However, in 2012, consensus could not be reached and some important programs were denied funding. What is next to do? Show the government again that the American people are serious about their food and knowing it has been produced responsibly with the environment in mind.

Agriculture has become an important topic, because it affects all of us. We all eat. And as the old saying goes, we are what we eat.

 

Google fair use

Google fair use

 

Sources:

Field, Tory and Beverly Bell.”Harvesting Justice 12: Weeding Corporate Power out of Agricultural Policies — Communities Mobilize for Food and Farm Justice.” Harvesting Justice on sustainablog. April 30, 2013. http://sustainablog.org/2013/04/community-activism-farming-methods/

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1 Comment So Far

patrickdavidson on 6 May, 2013 at 3:09 am #
    

I agree, the power of education is an often underutilized tool. Many people are not informed as to the true nature of large corporations like Monsanto, and would likely hop on board if they only knew the information that those companies work so hard to hide.


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